COLLECTION PROCESS

Evidence collection encompasses both the recovery of biological substances or associated object{s) from a crime scene by Forensic Identification Specialists (FIS), and the taking of biological substances for analysis purposes from a suspect by warrant or consent. Biological substances recovered from crime scenes are deemed questioned samples, as the contributor of the sample has not yet been determined or confirmed. Known samples are those obtained by warrant or consent from an identified or known subject. Comparative analysis of the questioned and known samples may or may not provide evidence of an association or identification.

Tool Kits

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  • RCMP Blood Sample Kit

    This kit is blue and should not be confused with the databank blood sample kit.
  • RCMP Buccal Kit

    Put some content here about buccal kit
  • Databank Buccal Kit

    This is the Databank Buccal Kit. Major components of this kit is that you must submit the whole kit with the same corresponding number.
  • Databank Blood Kit

    This is the Databank Blood Kit. Major components of this kit is that you must submit the whole kit with the same corresponding number.

Introductory of Sample Collection

The sensitive nature of biological substances places increased importance on evidence collection and continuity issues. Investigators involved in the recovery of questioned samples at a crime scene, or the obtaining of known substances, must be alert to the possibility of contamination, degradation and communicable disease exposure.

Contamination

The sensitive nature of biological substances places increased importance on evidence collection and continuity issues. The need for concern with respect to contamination by police and other first responder personnel in the initial attendance to calls is illustrated in those circumstances where sudden death reports may subsequently become murder investigations. It must be borne in mind that contamination will not change DNA from one type into another. Person A’s DNA cannot be changed into Person B’s through contamination. In these circumstances a mixed profile can occur. Depending on the quantity and quality of the sample obtained, the forensic laboratory may be able to distinguish the mixed profiles contained within the sample. Investigators involved in the recovery of questioned samples at a crime scene, or the obtaining of known substances, must be alert to the possibility of contamination, degradation and communicable disease exposure.

Degradation

The sensitive nature of biological substances places increased importance on evidence collection and continuity issues. Degradation is the actual breaking down or decomposition of the sample, ultimately affecting its suitability for analysis. Once outside of the host environment of the body, degradation of the biological substance will occur. Degraded samples will either not be suitable for analysis or will produce inconclusive results. Elements which may contribute to the degradation of biological samples include:

  • Time. The longer the time the biological material has been exposed to elements, the greater the degradation.
  • Temperature. High temperatures facilitate the growth of bacteria which can be destructive to DNA samples.
  • Light. Exposure to sunlight and UV rays can degrade a sample.
  • Humidity. Moisture promotes bacterial and fungi growth which can be destructive to DNA samples.

The above four factors are of equal concern in relation to the collection, packaging, transportation and storage of biological samples. Each factor may occur independently or in combination to degrade biological material. involved in the recovery of questioned samples at a crime scene, or the obtaining of known substances, must be alert to the possibility of contamination, degradation and communicable disease exposure.